info@allkidzcanada.com

Learn Why Probiotics are Essential to Your Child’s Health

Probiotics are all the buzz right now. But, what exactly is a probiotic? Let’s break it down, the word probiotic comes from the Greek word pro meaning “promoting” and biotic meaning “life.”

 

They are known as friendly microorganisms that live mainly inside our gut. We often associate bacteria as causing disease, but what if we told you that probiotics are GOOD bacteria that can be beneficial to our bodies!

 

Probiotics work to balance the number of good microorganisms versus the not so good microorganisms that live in your body. By establishing a good balance of microorganisms – your immune system and digestive system are able to maintain a healthy environment. This healthy balance reduces your child’s susceptibility to colds, digestive concerns, allergies, and more.

 

Probiotics - PROTECT, PREVENT AND PLAY!

 

Probiotics, PROTECT!

They help us to:

  1. Have a healthy digestive system9
  2. Have a strong immune system (more than 70% of your immune system lives in your gut!)8, 11
  3. Create a friendly and healthy gut environment by outnumbering bad bacteria
  4. Protective us from invading pathogens

 

Probiotics, PREVENT!

Probiotics can help children with:

  • Colic1
  • Eczema12
  • Diarrhea3,7
  • Allergies5
  • Negative effects from antibiotic exposure7
  • Common colds6
  • Asthma4
  • And more!

 

Probiotics, PLAY!

So, you can see how probiotics are friendly and can help our children have a

  • Happy tummy
  • Happy skin
  • Happy immune system
  • Happy development

 

To increase the number of good bacteria that your child receives, you can supplement with a good quality probiotic. Alternatively, probiotics are present in fermented foods such as yogurt, kefir, kombucha, and sauerkraut. In order to get enough probiotics into your system a supplement can be the best option! Be sure your child consumes the probiotic supplement with food to ensure optimal absorption!


About the author:

Dr. Samina Mitha, ND
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/saminamitha/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/saminamitha/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/saminamitha
Website: www.saminamitha.com


References:

  1. Anabrees, Jasim et al. “Probiotics for Infantile Colic: A Systematic Review.” BMC Pediatrics 13 (2013): 186.
  2. Chapman, CM et al. “Health benefits of probiotics: are mixtures more effective than single strains?” Eur J Nutr 50.1 (2011): 1-17.
  3. Cruchet, Sylvia et al. “The Use of Probiotics in Pediatric Gastroenterology: A Review of the Literature and Recommendations by Latin-American Experts.” Paediatric Drugs 17.3 (2015): 199–216.
  4. Das, Rashmi Ranjan. “Cesarean delivery, antibiotic exposure, and probiotics: Relationship with childhood asthma.” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 128.5 ( 2011): 1133-1134.
  5. Furrie, Elizabeth. “Probiotics and Allergy.” Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 64.4 (2005): 465-469.
  6. Hatakka, Katja et al. “Effect of Long Term Consumption of Probiotic Milk on Infections in Children Attending Day Care Centres: Double Blind, Randomised Trial.” BMJ : British Medical Journal 322.7298 (2001): 1327.
  7. Hempel, Susanne et al. “Probiotics for the Prevention and Treatment of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.” JAMA 307.18 (2012):1959-1969.
  8. Mueller, Noel T. et al. “The Infant Microbiome Development: Mom Matters.” Trends in molecular medicine 21.2 (2015): 109-117.
  9. Quigley, Eamonn M. M. “Gut Bacteria in Health and Disease.” Gastroenterology & Hepatology 9.9 (2013): 560–569.
  10. Scourboutakos, Mary et al. “Mismatch Between Probiotic Benefits in Trials Versus Food Products.” Nutrients 9.4 (2017): 400.
  11. Vighi, G et al. “Allergy and the Gastrointestinal System.” Clinical and Experimental Immunology 153.Suppl 1 (2008): 3-6.
  12. Yeşilova, Yavuz et al. “Effect of Probiotics on the Treatment of Children with Atopic Dermatitis.” Annals of Dermatology 24.2 (2012): 189–193.

Leave a Comment